Bishop David L. Ricken

Birthday: 9 November 1952
Education:

Bachelor’s in Philosophy – Conception College Seminary, Conception, MI
Theological Studies – St. Meinrad School of Theology, Rockport, IN
Master’s in Sacred Theology – Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium
Licentiate in Canon Law – Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome, Italy

Ordination: 12 September 1980
Episcopate: 6 January 2000
Twitter dricken@gbdioc.org

Bishop David L. Ricken on the Issues

Viganò testimony

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Amoris Laetitia

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Pro-life leadership

Actively engages in pro-life leadership
  • Bishop Ricken serves on the board of directors at Human Life Action, an organization founded in 1974 that advocates for pro-life laws at the federal level, supports pro-life Catholic groups, and strives to end Roe v. Wade. (Human Life Action)
  • On January 18, 2011, Bishop Ricken blessed two crisis pregnancy centers in Appleton. The centers serve hundreds of women every year and are located directly across the street from Planned Parenthood facilities. (Pro-Life Wisconsin)

Homosexuality

Not enough evidence collected on this issue
  • In 2012, Bishop Ricken told his diocese that voting for a politician who supports gay “marriage” could put their soul in jeopardy because gay “marriage” is intrinsically evil. (LifeSiteNews)

Abortion politics

Not enough evidence collected on this issue
  • In 2012, Bishop Ricken told his diocese that voting for a politician who supports abortion could put their soul in jeopardy because abortion is intrinsically evil. (LifeSiteNews)

Contraception

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

“LGBT” ideology

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Liturgy

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Marriage and Family Life

Not enough evidence collected on this issue
  • In 2012, Bishop Ricken told his diocese that voting for a politician who supports euthanasia, cloning, or embryonic stem cell research could put their soul in jeopardy because those issues are intrinsically evil. (LifeSiteNews)

Education

Upholds Church teaching on education
  • In November 2015, Bishop Ricken addressed the Green Bay Area Catholic Education School System. In his remarks, Bishop Ricken elaborated on what he called the “intellectual benefits” of a classical liberal education. (Green Bay Area Catholic Education)
  • In April 2015, Ricken strongly rebuked a Catholic Wisconsin college for hosting pro-abortion feminist Gloria Steinem. Ricken urged the college to embrace the Church’s teachings and told his diocese he did not approve in any way Steinem’s appearance. (LifeSiteNews)
  • At the 2011 diocesan wide “all school” mass, Bishop Rickens told over 900 students that Catholic schools educate the whole person and not just the mind. “Not just the body, but also the spirit,” he said. (Diocese of Green Bay)
  • Bishop Ricken wrote an article in 2009 critiquing what he called “a revolution” that amounted to “heresy and schism” in 1960s Catholic education. Ricken praised St. John Paul II’s Ex Corde Ecclesia and quoted from Cardinal Newman’s essay “The Idea of a University” to explain why Catholic schools must draw from the wisdom of the Church’s teaching in its instruction. (The Cardinal Newman Society)
  • In April 2009, Bishop Ricken was inducted into the Catholic Education Foundation’s Hall of Fame. The Catholic Education Foundation is a national, grass roots effort to preserve and expand Catholic secondary schools. (Diocese of Green Bay)
  • Bishop Ricken founded the Wyoming School of Catholic Thought at Wyoming Catholic College when he was bishop of Cheyenne, Wyoming. Ricken has said that he hopes participants in the Wyoming School of Catholic Thought will be formed “both spiritually and intellectually, which will enable them to play their part in a new Catholic Renaissance.” (Wyoming Catholic College)
  • When Bishop Ricken was the bishop of Cheyenne, Wyoming, he helped co-found Wyoming Catholic College in 2007, a staunchly conservative school faithful to Church teaching that instructs students in liberal arts and classical Western literature. (National Catholic Register)