Bishop James V. Johnston, Jr.

Birthday: 16 October 1959
Education:

Bachelor’s in Electrical Engineering – University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
Master of Divinity Degree – St. Meinrad School of Theology, Rockport, IN
Licentiate in Canon Law – Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.

Ordination: 9 June 1990
Episcopate: 31 March 2008
Facebook Twitter 816-756-1850 bishopsoffice@diocesekcsj.org

Bishop James V. Johnston, Jr. on the Issues

Viganò testimony

Supports investigating Archbishop Viganò’s claims
  • Bishop Johnston stated in a 2018 blog post that he believes Archbishop Vigano’s testimony is a “credible report.” Johnston also expressed his support for an investigation into McCarrick’s actions and called for his brother bishops to “be able to hold one another accountable.” (Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph)

Amoris Laetitia

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Pro-life leadership

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Homosexuality

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Abortion politics

Not enough evidence collected on this issue
  • In a 2019 blog post, Bishop Johnston condemned Catholic politicians who support abortion, saying that “to be Catholic is to be pro-child, pro-woman, and pro-life.” Johnston also stated that Catholic politicians who vote to strengthen abortion laws should “not present themselves for Holy Communion” unless they sincerely repent of their “grave sin.” (Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph)

Contraception

Not enough evidence collected on this issue
  • In a 2018 blog post, Bishop Johnston celebrated the 50th anniversary of the “prophetic” encyclical, Humanae Vitae, and condemned contraception as “intrinsically evil.” Johnston affirmed that contraception is “contrary to natural law” since it works to deliberately sever “the unitive and procreative parts of married love.” (Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph)

“LGBT” ideology

Not enough evidence collected on this issue

Liturgy

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Marriage and Family Life

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Education

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